‘Book Inflation’ and Author-Editor Relationships

I write like fat ladies diet.Stephen King In 1914, poets TS Eliot and Ezra Pound met while living as exiles in Europe, and their famous friendship went on to produce one of the defining masterpieces of Modernist poetry. Eliot's 'The Waste Land', in its final form, was first published in literary magazine The Criterion [October... Continue Reading →

Flash Fiction: ‘The Things We Left Behind’ by Michael Lacare

There was nowhere to go but everywhere [...]Jack Kerouac Michael Lacare is a Pushcart Prize-nominated writer whose work has appeared in The Rumpus, Able Muse, and Salon. He lives in Florida with his wife Lori where he spends his time writing and drinking copious amounts of black coffee. Follow him on Twitter: @MikeLacare. The Things... Continue Reading →

Monsters, Anglo-Saxons, and ‘Beowulf’

[…] a wild folktale […] David Crystal regards Beowulf as “the greatest poetic creation of the Old English Period”. This may well be true when one considers its influence, not only in literature, but cinema as well. Whether translated loosely or directly, each of its adaptations, while fundamentally similar, possess key differences that set them... Continue Reading →

Writing Lesson: ‘The Exorcist’ vs. ‘The Shining’

The road to hell is paved with adverbs.Stephen King Today we look at two defining novels of the horror genre, both of which have been adapted for screen to great acclaim. Adapting a work of fiction for cinema or stage sometimes means chopping it up and stitching it back together again. Other times, it might... Continue Reading →

Joseph Conrad’s ‘Heart of Darkness’

During the last decade of the 19th Century, also known as the Fin-de-Siècle, anxieties about the state of the nation, and the species, were rife. The British Empire was in decline and imperial guilt haunted Britain. Novels like Dracula and Herland laid bare unconscious fears of suffrage and the bohemian New Woman, but it was... Continue Reading →

The Genesis of ‘Frankenstein’

In the summer of 1816, a group of young intellectuals, all fleeing debt and scandal, gathered together at a villa on the shores of Lake Geneva. Mary Godwin (daughter of William Godwin and radical feminist Mary Wollstonecraft) had already eloped with her future husband Percy Bysshe Shelley once before, who, in turn, had abandoned his... Continue Reading →

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