Q&A with Writer-Scholar Simon Lee-Price

Simon Lee-Price returns to answer our questions about his academic research, writerly inspirations, and the role that philosophy plays in literature. How do Romantics like Lord Byron inform the trope of the suffering writer? Moreover, what can we learn from Henry Miller about writing? And how does habitual creativity inspire writers and artists to carry... Continue Reading →

David Ogilvy: Puerto Rico, Good Luck Margarine, and Dove Soap

After sundown, I drink nothing but Puerto Rico rum and Schweppes.David Ogilvy David Ogilvy believed in his clients' products and potential. If a client refused to meet his demands, he'd cut ties and show them the door, but he took great care of the clients that he didn't send packing. In many cases, he crafted... Continue Reading →

‘A Writer’s Work is Never Done’ by Simon Lee-Price

Simon Lee-Price hails from Liverpool and lives and writes in the UK. His short stories and non-fiction have appeared in numerous literary journals, including Prole, Prose and Poetry, Interpreter’s House, The Caribbean Writer, and in several horror and speculative fiction anthologies. He tweets from time to time: @SimonLeePrice. A Writer’s Work is Never Done By... Continue Reading →

David Ogilvy: Rolls-Royce, Schweppes, and ‘The man in the Hathaway shirt’

Half the money I spend on advertising is wasted, and the trouble is I don’t know which half... David Ogilvy remains the undisputed king of Madison Avenue. No one besides the fictional Don Draper has garnered the same kind of prestige synonymous with success in advertising. But before Ogilvy had ever written his first headline,... Continue Reading →

Rules for Crafting Fiction

Brevity is the soul of wit.William Shakespeare Crafting a compelling story, be it a novel, short story, or flash fiction, takes discipline. Great writing isn’t so much about impressing the reader with wit or clever description as brutalising your raw prose until the final product is taut and powerful – until each word becomes a... Continue Reading →

‘Book Inflation’ and Author-Editor Relationships

I write like fat ladies diet.Stephen King In 1914, poets TS Eliot and Ezra Pound met while living as exiles in Europe, and their famous friendship went on to produce one of the defining masterpieces of Modernist poetry. Eliot's 'The Waste Land', in its final form, was first published in literary magazine The Criterion [October... Continue Reading →

Crime Fiction | ‘Roman Noir’ and Hardboiled Private Eyes

You were dead, you were sleeping the big sleep [...], oil and water were the same as wind and air to you. You just slept the big sleep, not caring about the nastiness of how you died or where you fell. Me, I was part of the nastiness now. Far more a part of it... Continue Reading →

Humour, Narrative Perspective, and Meaning | Margaret Atwood and Xiaolu Guo

The world is a comedy to those that think, a tragedy to those that feel.Horace Walpole For Jonathan Swift, writing humour, or rather satire, is as simple as a pair of bellows blowing wind up a dog's rear end until, at last, the poor thing explodes. (Have tastes changed all that much?) But fiction writers... Continue Reading →

Charis Wightman on Writing ‘The Girl from Saikea’

Author and English teacher Charis Wightman (Manchester Writing School) recently published her first novel, The Girl from Saikea on Amazon. The story deals with sensitive themes like totalitarianism, politics, and human rights. Protagonist Mai's struggle for freedom and a sense of identity outside the confines of Saikea (her home country ruled with an iron grip)... Continue Reading →

Robert Nelson Talks Mother Tongue Other Tongue

Today we speak to Manchester Writing School alum and School Liaison Assistant Robert Nelson from the Manchester Metropolitan University. Read on to learn about the prize-winning Mother Tongue, Other Tongue poetry project, the importance of Creative Writing in today's world, and Robert's own writing interests. Follow him on Instagram: @infinitelyrobert. Tell us about the Mother... Continue Reading →

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