‘A Writer’s Work is Never Done’ by Simon Lee-Price

Simon Lee-Price hails from Liverpool and lives and writes in the UK. His short stories and non-fiction have appeared in numerous literary journals, including Prole, Prose and Poetry, Interpreter’s House, The Caribbean Writer, and in several horror and speculative fiction anthologies. He tweets from time to time: @SimonLeePrice. A Writer’s Work is Never Done By... Continue Reading →

‘Book Inflation’ and Author-Editor Relationships

I write like fat ladies diet.Stephen King In 1914, poets TS Eliot and Ezra Pound met while living as exiles in Europe, and their famous friendship went on to produce one of the defining masterpieces of Modernist poetry. Eliot's 'The Waste Land', in its final form, was first published in literary magazine The Criterion [October... Continue Reading →

Crime Fiction | ‘Roman Noir’ and Hardboiled Private Eyes

You were dead, you were sleeping the big sleep [...], oil and water were the same as wind and air to you. You just slept the big sleep, not caring about the nastiness of how you died or where you fell. Me, I was part of the nastiness now. Far more a part of it... Continue Reading →

Humour, Narrative Perspective, and Meaning | Margaret Atwood and Xiaolu Guo

The world is a comedy to those that think, a tragedy to those that feel.Horace Walpole For Jonathan Swift, writing humour, or rather satire, is as simple as a pair of bellows blowing wind up a dog's rear end until, at last, the poor thing explodes. (Have tastes changed all that much?) But fiction writers... Continue Reading →

Monsters, Anglo-Saxons, and ‘Beowulf’

[…] a wild folktale […] David Crystal regards Beowulf as “the greatest poetic creation of the Old English Period”. This may well be true when one considers its influence, not only in literature, but cinema as well. Whether translated loosely or directly, each of its adaptations, while fundamentally similar, possess key differences that set them... Continue Reading →

Joseph Conrad’s ‘Heart of Darkness’

During the last decade of the 19th Century, also known as the Fin-de-Siècle, anxieties about the state of the nation, and the species, were rife. The British Empire was in decline and imperial guilt haunted Britain. Novels like Dracula and Herland laid bare unconscious fears of suffrage and the bohemian New Woman, but it was... Continue Reading →

The Genesis of ‘Frankenstein’

In the summer of 1816, a group of young intellectuals, all fleeing debt and scandal, gathered together at a villa on the shores of Lake Geneva. Mary Godwin (daughter of William Godwin and radical feminist Mary Wollstonecraft) had already eloped with her future husband Percy Bysshe Shelley once before, who, in turn, had abandoned his... Continue Reading →

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